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TOP 10 CEILING HOME THEATER SURROUND SPEAKERS of 2011 | plasmalcdnparts.com

Posted 31 March 2011 | News & Blog   

One of the most important things to consider when shopping for in-wall, on-wall, or in-ceiling speakers is where you’re going to place them and your budget. How you place your speakers depends on how you’re going to listen to them, as well as what your room’s architecture allows. Whether you’re installing them in your current home or pre-wiring a home that’s under construction, the guidelines below can help you get a speaker setup that sounds good and works with the build and design of your room.

Keep in mind that these are ideal guidelines, but in reality, you may have to go with whats in your budget.

After you’ve determined what type of speakers you’ll need and how many, CALL US NOW! 832-427-5026

PLASMA LCD n PARTS and HOME THEATER INSTALLATION
PRESENTS:
Top 10 Home Theater In-Wall Speakers 2011

1. Polk Audio RC85i 2-Way In-Wall Speakers (Pair, White)

2. Polk Audio RC65i 2-Way In-Wall Speakers (Pair, White)

3. Polk Audio RC55i 2-Way In-Wall Speakers (Pair, White)

4. Phoenix Gold ATi6 6.5-Inch In-Wall Speakers, White (Pair)

5. Yamaha NS-IW760 6.5″ 2-Way In-Wall Speaker System (White)

6. Pioneer S-IW651-LR CST Series 6.5-Inch Rectangular In-Wall Speakers (Pair)

7. Atlantic Technology IWTS-4LCR-IP-S In-Wall LCR Speaker (White)

8. Yamaha NS-IW660 3-Way In-Wall Speaker System for Custom Install, White

9. Audioaccess AAS6 2-Way In-Wall Speaker with 6.5-Inch Woofer and 1-Inch Titanium

10. Definitive Technology UIWBP/A In-Wall/Ceiling Bipolar Surround Speaker (Single, White)

TIPS ON HOW, WHEN, AND READY TO DO A HOME THEATER IN CEILING WALL SPEAKER INSTALLATION:

You should place your speakers for critical listening if you plan to use them as your home theater speakers. Try to place speakers at least 2 feet away from corners and other surfaces that might interfere with or reflect sound, such as tall or bulky furniture.

If you’re installing 5, 6, or 7 in-ceiling speakers for a home theater surround sound system:

Place the front left and right speakers at an equal distance from your main listening position, in front of your TV, about 2-3 feet away from the wall. If the speakers are 10 feet from your chair, place them no more than 10 feet and no less than 5 feet apart from each other to maintain a good stereo effect. Measure the distance from the speakers to your chair in a level, horizontal line — i.e. don’t measure upwards from your seat to the speakers in the ceiling. If your speaker’s tweeters can swivel, aim them towards your seating position. This can help create a realistic soundfield — you’ll be able to hear objects on the screen as they move from left to right.
As you’re choosing speaker locations, also keep in mind the effects of reflected sound. Even if you angle the tweeters toward you, you’ll still hear the sound that’s reflected off the wall behind the speakers. Ideally, that reflection should be at the same level as your TV screen. You can figure out how far away from the wall you should place your in-ceiling speakers by using a mirror. Mark the spot on the ceiling where you think the speaker should go, then sit in your favorite listening position. Ask a helper to hold a mirror up to the wall, moving it up or down until you can see the mark on the ceiling reflected in the mirror. That’s where the sound will reflect off the wall. If the speakers are too close to the wall, the reflection will be too high; too far away from the wall, and the reflection will be too low. In some setups, you may find that you prefer to aim the tweeters directly at that spot wall to get more reflected sound. If your in-ceiling speakers have that feature, experiment with aiming your tweeter before you put the grille on.
Place the center channel speaker right in the middle of the front left and right speakers. Also aim its tweeter (if possible) directly towards your seating position.
See the images below for placement of surround speakers in 5-, 6-, and 7-speaker setups. If you have aimable tweeters in your surround speakers, you’ll generally also want to aim those towards your seating position. You may also position these speakers closer to the adjoining wall than the front speakers. The sound will reflect off of a higher point on the wall, which is generally desirable for surround speakers.

Critical listening: Home theater
You should place your speakers for critical listening if you plan to use them as your home theater speakers. Try to place speakers at least 2 feet away from corners and other surfaces that might interfere with or reflect sound, such as tall or bulky furniture.

If you’re installing 5, 6, or 7 in-wall or on-wall speakers for a home theater surround sound system:

Place the front left and right speakers so that they’re at or slightly above ear level when you’re seated, both equidistant from the main listening position. If the speakers are in a wall that’s 10 feet from your chair, place them no more than 10 feet and no less than 5 feet apart from each other to maintain a good stereo effect.
Place the center channel speaker so that it’s at ear level when you’re seated. If your television is wall-mounted, place the center channel speaker slightly below. If your TV rests on a stand or table, place the center channel speaker just above it, and angle the tweeters down towards seated ear level if possible.
Place the surround speakers above seated ear level (as high as standing ear level). If the rear surround speakers are placed at seated ear level, they will overwhelm the sound coming from your front speakers, resulting in muddied and inaccurate surround sound.

If you’re installing 5, 6, or 7 in-ceiling speakers for a home theater surround sound system:

Place the front left and right speakers at an equal distance from your main listening position, in front of your TV, about 2-3 feet away from the wall. If the speakers are 10 feet from your chair, place them no more than 10 feet and no less than 5 feet apart from each other to maintain a good stereo effect. Measure the distance from the speakers to your chair in a level, horizontal line — i.e. don’t measure upwards from your seat to the speakers in the ceiling. If your speaker’s tweeters can swivel, aim them towards your seating position. This can help create a realistic soundfield — you’ll be able to hear objects on the screen as they move from left to right.
As you’re choosing speaker locations, also keep in mind the effects of reflected sound. Even if you angle the tweeters toward you, you’ll still hear the sound that’s reflected off the wall behind the speakers. Ideally, that reflection should be at the same level as your TV screen. You can figure out how far away from the wall you should place your in-ceiling speakers by using a mirror. Mark the spot on the ceiling where you think the speaker should go, then sit in your favorite listening position. Ask a helper to hold a mirror up to the wall, moving it up or down until you can see the mark on the ceiling reflected in the mirror. That’s where the sound will reflect off the wall. If the speakers are too close to the wall, the reflection will be too high; too far away from the wall, and the reflection will be too low. In some setups, you may find that you prefer to aim the tweeters directly at that spot wall to get more reflected sound. If your in-ceiling speakers have that feature, experiment with aiming your tweeter before you put the grille on.
Place the center channel speaker right in the middle of the front left and right speakers. Also aim its tweeter (if possible) directly towards your seating position.
See the images below for placement of surround speakers in 5-, 6-, and 7-speaker setups. If you have aimable tweeters in your surround speakers, you’ll generally also want to aim those towards your seating position. You may also position these speakers closer to the adjoining wall than the front speakers. The sound will reflect off of a higher point on the wall, which is generally desirable for surround speakers.

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